Laurianne's Hope

Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Events in the Works

Wow! I can't believe it has been a week and neither my dad or I has posted anything. Personally, I have been a little busy, and I know with my dad going back to work it has been busy for him too. We are still discovering our new version of normal. It is funny, but I can remember a time before Laurianne was born, and that seems normal, but not having her here doesn't even seem like it will feel normal.

I would like to point out a few events that are coming up:
  • Dr. Michael Siegel will be running a half-marathon, in part in memory of Laurianne. Please visit his sponsor page for more information, and possibly to make a donation. Every little bit helps, so even if you can only afford a dollar, it is a dollar closer t finding a cure. At this point, if every number on the counter for this page reprsented a person who would donate a dollar we would have $1003 dollars! That is half of his goal! The marathon will take place May 13.
  • Jamie Young, a lung cancer survivor, has organized an event called Playing for a Cure. This event will be held on Saturday, March 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. Awards will be given in memory of people who have succumbed to the disease. One of the awards that will be presented is the Laurianne's Hope Award. The Laurianne's Hope Award will be given to the winning middle school concert band. All proceeds will benefit the LUNGevity Foundation, which is dedicated exclusively to funding lung cancer research. I am hoping to be able to attend this festival, and present the award that will be given in memory of Laurianne.
  • I recieved an email from Women Against Lung Cancer that says they are having their Women Against Lung Cancer Annual Meeting at the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia on June 2, 2006. They are offering a limited number of travel grants. I am going to see what I can do to attend this event and make contacts in the fight against lung cancer. This event is for health care professionals and advocates.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 9:56 AM :: 1 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Tuesday, January 24, 2006

Lung Cancer Research Shows Race Play A Role

There is an interesting article in the AP, that says that black people are more likely to get lung cancer than any other race. The study was recorded in The New England Journal of Medicine. I am going to check with my dad if he can find me a copy of this article at work. I know I won't understand a lot of the medical stuff, but I am still curious about the actual article.

Although the article focuses mostly on smoking, since that is where the research is done, I found this point to be very intersting:
Black, Hispanic and Japanese-American men who never smoked had higher risks of lung cancer than white men, but hardly any difference was seen in women in the same ethnic groups.
Some of the things I would like to see reported is how this disease affects bi-racial children. We have a lot of bi-racial kids in our family. One of my cousins has two half-Iranian daughters. They are beautiful girls. Another cousin just had a baby boy, who is half-Chinese. Calem is half-black. I espcially worry about Calem. Will being bi-racial decrease his risk of the disease, or will it increase the risk? Will the fact that he was sharing 9 months of space with cancer affect his future? Only time, and careful watching of his health, will tell.

But, I think the most important thing this article highlights is that it is important to stop smoking to prevent lung cancer. No matter what race you are.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 2:26 PM :: 5 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Sunday, January 22, 2006

3 Month anniversary

It has been a long time ago that I contributed to this blog. I would like to thank my co-writer to keep this blog going . It has been just hard to write in between work and having no inspiration to write. but today is the 3 month anniversary of Laurianne's death.
Yesterday it was 13 weeks. I truly believe that Saturdays will never be the same again for the rest of my life. I found the below poem what I put up today in Laurianne's memory and I will also burn a candle by her picture.


Support From Others
Author Unknown

Don’t tell me that you understand.
Don’t tell me that you know.
Don’t tell me that I will survive,
How I will surely grow.
Don’t come at me with answers
That can only come from me.
Don’t tell me how my grief will pass,
That I will soon be free.
Accept me in my ups and downs.
I need someone to share.
Just hold my hand and let me cry
And say, “My friend, I care.”


Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 10:24 AM :: 2 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Friday, January 20, 2006

Playing For A Cure

Playing for a Cure
Invitational Band and Classical Solo Competition

A concert festival for middle school and high school bands

Saturday, March 4, 2006
Wooddale Middle School, Memphis, Tennessee
9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Jamie Young is organizing this event. She is a lung cancer survivor and is working hard to raise awareness. Please visit www.lungevity.org/playingforacure for more information.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 1:30 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Wednesday, January 18, 2006

No Room For Blame

I "chatted" with Jamie Young through www.lcaware.org, and she gave me permission to use this article. My dad found it originally and he was very touched by her story. He immediately emailed me and said, "Can we use this?" So, with Jamie's blessing, I am sharing her story with you.

Also, Jamie will be having a lung cancer awareness event on March 4. She asked to use Laurianne's story. I hope that Laurianne's story will help bring awareness that young people can get lung cancer, also. Young people like Jamie and Laurianne.

No Room for Blame
By JAMIE YOUNG

Lung cancer is the Number One killer cancer. That sentence scared me to death when I was diagnosed.

Along with the statistics and the negativity that surrounds Lung Cancer. From speaking with numerous people, I have found that the negative stigma, namely smoking, has a lot to do with the perception some people have of Lung cancer patients.

Some people honestly feel that these patients deserve what they got. Give me a break.

In my opinion, it's extremely unfair and unkind for anyone to say they brought it on themselves. I haven't met a lung cancer patient yet that had any idea what they would go through if they got lung cancer from smoking.

Believe me if you knew what it felt like to have chemotherapy, radiation or surgery, you would definitely re-evaluate the smoking issue. If you truly understood what it was like to not be able to walk through a big store because you were totally exhausted and out of breath? Or, if you had to get a feeding tube because the radiation burned your esophagus and nerves at the base of your brain so badly that you couldn't eat for about two and a half to three months, you would definitely want to quit smoking.

I can promise you that I didn't bring this on myself and I wouldn't wish this terrible disease on anyone. Smoking is a terrible addiction and a hard habit to break.

Unfortunately, this is not a perfect world and we are not a perfect people and of course, "hindsight is 20/20". But, I can tell you this. The Lung cancer patients that I have met have been some of the most considerate and caring human beings that I have ever crossed paths with in my whole life.

These wonderful people don't deserve what they got. They don't deserve the physical pain and the anguish of not knowing whether or not they will be alive tomorrow or the next day.

Nobody deserves that.

No matter what they have done in the past, they deserve the chance to live and be cured just as much as the next sick person.

We may not be a perfect people, but we can be forgiving and we can definitely be empathetic.

When I taught school, one of the most important things that I tried to instill in my kids was empathy.

Caring for others and looking at the world through someone else's eyes without judgment.

We, as adults, can learn a lot from children. My three year old teaches me something new everyday and he is one of the most empathetic people that I know. He loves everyone and has a true concern for their feelings. It doesn't matter what they look like, what they do for a living, what their bad habits are or how old they are. He wants them to be happy and feel good. I sure wish we could all see the world that way. What a carefree and happy group of people we would be.

Cancer patients in many ways have been blessed. Although the statistics are not a welcoming figure for people diagnosed with this terrible disease, we still have the chance to use what time we have left to our advantage. If we live one year or 50 years, we have learned to cherish each day like it was our last. In this respect, we are very blessed. Life looks totally different through a cancer patient's eyes. When you can look death in the face and say, "Go away, I'm not finished yet, you are ready to live"!!! More funding for research would give us encouragement and hope.

Many Lung cancer patients give up hope and don't have the will to survive. New medicine, therapies, treatments and young people wanting to focus on this illness as a lifelong career is the only way to beat this disease and give the 160,000+ that are diagnosed every year the hope they need to look forward to the future.

Some people may ask the question. What about those people that continue to smoke after being diagnosed?

My answer to that is, "What about those people that never smoked and were diagnosed? There are no clear answers and why point fingers. Help should be given to anyone that needs it and asks for it.

That's what God wants to do. Help your neighbor.

Lung cancer has changed my life for the better in many ways. Now, I cherish each day I have with my family. I have a very intimate relationship with GOD and I know why I am here.

I have many things to be thankful for and I definitely can't complain. My hopes and prayers are that every person can reach an inner peace with the understanding that helping our brothers is one of the greatest commandments.

Having a purpose in life gives you something to live for. Find your purpose and keep living.

I would love to invite you to visit the www.lchelp.org website and see for yourself the dynamic individuals that have been touched by cancer in one way or another.

I am so fortunate to have this group of people to keep my spirits up and who truly care for me. They love you for who you are. I visit the site everyday and anxiously wait to hear good news. The good news gives you hope and with hope you have faith.

Lung cancer is the Number One killer cancer. That sentence scared me to death when I was diagnosed.

Along with the statistics and the negativity that surrounds Lung Cancer. From speaking with numerous people, I have found that the negative stigma, namely smoking, has a lot to do with the perception some people have of Lung cancer patients.

Some people honestly feel that these patients deserve what they got. Give me a break.

In my opinion, it's extremely unfair and unkind for anyone to say they brought it on themselves. I haven't met a lung cancer patient yet that had any idea what they would go through if they got lung cancer from smoking.

Believe me if you knew what it felt like to have chemotherapy, radiation or surgery, you would definitely re-evaluate the smoking issue. If you truly understood what it was like to not be able to walk through a big store because you were totally exhausted and out of breath? Or, if you had to get a feeding tube because the radiation burned your esophagus and nerves at the base of your brain so badly that you couldn't eat for about two and a half to three months, you would definitely want to quit smoking.

I can promise you that I didn't bring this on myself and I wouldn't wish this terrible disease on anyone. Smoking is a terrible addiction and a hard habit to break.

Unfortunately, this is not a perfect world and we are not a perfect people and of course, "hindsight is 20/20". But, I can tell you this. The Lung cancer patients that I have met have been some of the most considerate and caring human beings that I have ever crossed paths with in my whole life.

These wonderful people don't deserve what they got. They don't deserve the physical pain and the anguish of not knowing whether or not they will be alive tomorrow or the next day.

Nobody deserves that.

No matter what they have done in the past, they deserve the chance to live and be cured just as much as the next sick person.

We may not be a perfect people, but we can be forgiving and we can definitely be empathetic.

When I taught school, one of the most important things that I tried to instill in my kids was empathy.

Caring for others and looking at the world through someone else's eyes without judgment.

We, as adults, can learn a lot from children. My three year old teaches me something new everyday and he is one of the most empathetic people that I know. He loves everyone and has a true concern for their feelings. It doesn't matter what they look like, what they do for a living, what their bad habits are or how old they are. He wants them to be happy and feel good. I sure wish we could all see the world that way. What a carefree and happy group of people we would be.

Cancer patients in many ways have been blessed. Although the statistics are not a welcoming figure for people diagnosed with this terrible disease, we still have the chance to use what time we have left to our advantage. If we live one year or 50 years, we have learned to cherish each day like it was our last. In this respect, we are very blessed. Life looks totally different through a cancer patient's eyes. When you can look death in the face and say, "Go away, I'm not finished yet, you are ready to live"!!! More funding for research would give us encouragement and hope.

Many Lung cancer patients give up hope and don't have the will to survive. New medicine, therapies, treatments and young people wanting to focus on this illness as a lifelong career is the only way to beat this disease and give the 160,000+ that are diagnosed every year the hope they need to look forward to the future.

Some people may ask the question. What about those people that continue to smoke after being diagnosed?

My answer to that is, "What about those people that never smoked and were diagnosed? There are no clear answers and why point fingers. Help should be given to anyone that needs it and asks for it.

That's what God wants to do. Help your neighbor.

Lung cancer has changed my life for the better in many ways. Now, I cherish each day I have with my family. I have a very intimate relationship with GOD and I know why I am here.

I have many things to be thankful for and I definitely can't complain. My hopes and prayers are that every person can reach an inner peace with the understanding that helping our brothers is one of the greatest commandments.

Having a purpose in life gives you something to live for. Find your purpose and keep living.

I would love to invite you to visit the www.lchelp.org website and see for yourself the dynamic individuals that have been touched by cancer in one way or another.

I am so fortunate to have this group of people to keep my spirits up and who truly care for me. They love you for who you are. I visit the site everyday and anxiously wait to hear good news. The good news gives you hope and with hope you have faith.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 1:36 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------
RedToeNail.org

Today I went to visit lcaware.org, and found information about a website dedicated to blogging about cancer. Anyone who has been touched by cancer can sign up there. The web site was started by Dr. Phil Berman who was diagnosed with lung cancer. The name of the site is RedToeNail.org.

I feel as though a site like this is very important. It raises awareness. It lets you know you aren't the only one out there. It lets you know that you can survive! Others have done so. Why not you or your family member?

And while I am plugging RedToeNail, I want to also give a big CONGRATULATIONS! to Dr. Berman. He just celebrated two years of survival. You can read about it on his blog at redtoenail.org.

Oh, and I am going to be sending in for my free button!

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 12:41 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Sunday, January 15, 2006

Sidebar Changes

Please notice that I put a new button on the sidebar to support Michael Siegel's Team in Training. He is running in memory of Laurianne, in addition to other family members he has lost. I know Laurianne would have been thrilled to be a part of this, because my aunt has chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Laurianne wanted to help her by storing her umblicial cord cells. Hopefully, the money donated will help researchers find a cure for my aunt and other people who are suffering from the disease.

Even if you can only donate a dollar, a dollar will make a big difference!

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 11:34 AM :: 2 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Friday, January 13, 2006

Back to work

It is now 3 days that I am back to work. I was of for 12 weeks thanks to the generosity of my co- workers who donated time for me. It was probably a good thing because it was a big change to become solitary caregivers of Calem and the enormous amount of sadness and grief we are experiencing.At one point I was even not sure if I ever could be a RN again. It has been good to be back. I have very supportive co-workers and admitting that I was somewhat nervous in the beginning it went well.Actually I think it is good to be on a routine again but then again after not work the last couple of months I could get used to that too quickly.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 5:13 PM :: 3 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Thursday, January 12, 2006

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society - Team In Training

Dr. Michael Siegel is going to run in memory of his mom, my sister and I believe, his two family members for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. I am very honored that he asked me about this, especially since I have only started visiting his blog this week. Please take a moment to visit his web page.

I will be updating the bookmarks when I have a chance.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 6:09 PM :: 1 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Wednesday, January 11, 2006

My Perspective

The internet is a wacky and wonderful place where people can share ideas, opinions and many other things. They can express opinions and debate points of view. Because of this, and because of blogging, I went in search of lung cancer blogs a few days ago. I saw a link for Lung Cancer Alliance, a group I gave a speech for in November, shortly after Laurianne died.

When I clicked on the link, I was very much surprised that it was an argument against Lung Cancer Alliance (at least my interpretation) and some work they did in November submitting a Lung Cancer Awareness proclamation to the California Governor's Office. This group worked really hard on the proclamation, and the governor's office made the choice to change the wording and make the proclamation an anti-smoking proclamation.

The California Proclamation stated:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
STATE OF CALIFORNIA

P R O C L A M A T I O N
by the
Governor of the State of California

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in California and the United States, killing more Americans than colon, breast and prostate cancers combined.

This year, an estimated 13,000 Californians will die from lung cancer and 16,000 will be newly diagnosed. More than 80 percent of lung and bronchus cancer is caused by cigarette smoking. While the majority of lung cancer deaths are related to active smoking, a small percentage of deaths can also be attributed to secondhand smoke, asbestos or radon exposure.

California has been a leader in the fight against lung cancer through comprehensive tobacco prevention efforts including public education campaigns, clean indoor-air laws and smoking cessation programs. The rate of lung and bronchial cancers has fallen steadily as a result.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month is a time to increase education about the causes of lung cancer and inform those at risk for the disease about the importance of quitting smoking. Through ongoing intervention and greater awareness, we can prevent the next generation of lung cancers cases.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor of the State of California, do hereby proclaim November 2005 as "Lung Cancer Awareness Month."

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have here unto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of California to be affixed this the thirty-first day of October 2005.

/s/ Arnold Schwarzenegger

Governor of California
The problem with this proclamation is that there is no focus on the non-smokers who get lung cancer. In October, Governor Schwarzenegger talked about "devastating medical, emotional and financial effects" of breast cancer for Breast Cancer Awareness month. Lung Cancer Alliance seeked the same sort of wording for lung cancer. The wording of the Lung Cancer Proclamation seemed aimed at smokers, instead of focusing on the disease and equality for all.

So, when I read this particular blog, I felt I needed to reply to it. I am not much of a fighter, but I would not be honoring my sister's memory by not saying anything, and since her death, I vowed I would be an advocate for lung cancer suffers, so my sister will not have died in vain.

Since that time, Dr. Siegel has received many commnets on his blog regarding this issue. I had changed my web address to point to Laurianne's Hope when I commented, but to be honest, I did not expect him to visit. Today, with his third post on the subject, he clarified his points regarding the issue. To my suprise, he also visited the little corner of the blogosphere my dad and I created in honor of my sister. I want to make sure the people who I pointed to this website and regular readers of this site are aware of his comment as well.
Lynda-
I'm responding here as well as your last post because I don't want people to miss what I have to say. I feel terrible that my comments have somehow been not conveyed clearly enough and there is a misimpression that somehow I think there is too much of an emphasis on lung cancer among nonsmokers or not a need to educate people about the problem of lung cancer among nonsmokers like your sister.

I hate for your readers to think that I would have said such a thing as that I think the Lung Cancer Alliance is focusing too much on nonsmokers and lung cancer. I think the focus on nonsmokers is entirely appropriate. In fact, I have devoted the bulk of my career to addressing the problem of lung cancer not in smokers, but in nonsmokers. In 2005, I buried two close members of my family, both nonsmokers who died of lung cancer (they had never smoked), and this simply re-juvenated me to continue fighting the battle to address the lung cancer problem among nonsmokers. I have approached this from the perspective, largely, of preventing secondhand smoke exposure, but there is also an urgent need for resources for treatment of lung cancer, since prevention does nothing once someone is affected.

So I hope it is clear that I did not, and would not say that there is too much emphasis on lung cancer among nonsmokers. In fact, there is not enough emphasis (I myself have seen doctors who've suggested that a patient cannot have lung cancer since they don't smoke) and I'm trying to use my career to increase the focus and attention on lung cancer among nonsmokers.

So I fully support the efforts to increase the visibility of the problem among nonsmokers, and to represent nonsmokers who are affected by the disease. My two relatives who I just lost would certainly be honored by these heroic efforts.

My only point of contention was when there was criticism for mentioning smoking or mentioning it too prominently. I don't see how that detracts from the important work that the Lung Cancer Alliance is doing. It seems to me that both of the aims - preventing lung cancer and treating it - can be achieved without having to undermine each other.

I am taking the time out to write because the last thing in the world I would want is for you and/or your readers and friends and family to think that in some way, I do not fully support you and your cause and your goals. There's nothing further from the truth.

God bless you!
I realize that Dr. Siegel and I are fighting for the same purpose. We both want equality for all lung cancer suffers, whether they are smokers or not. Personally, I would rather have Dr. Siegel as a friend and not a foe. He has stated, "I have devoted the bulk of my career to addressing the problem of lung cancer not in smokers, but in nonsmokers." I definately am for the continuation of research of lung cancer, and its effects on non-smokers. I don't want to see anyone, smoker, former smokers, second-hand smoker and non-smokers alike, or their family have to suffer from this devastating disease. I know from personal experience how painful it is.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 10:37 PM :: 3 people are more aware
---------------------------------------
My opinion about the last couple of blogs

With interest, did I read the blogs of the last couple of days from Dr. Siegel and the response of my daughter, Lynda. I really want to thank the affected parties for their input. I think most people associate smoking with lung cancer and are thinking that lung cancer is a primary smokers disease. It has hampered the funding for research and treatments in comparison to other types of cancers in my opinion. In this respect, I feel there should be more education that lung cancer is not a primary smokers disease, but that it is also prevalent in non smokers. The proclamation and making November Lung Cancer Awareness month could have been a good start in that direction, but putting the emphasis in the proclamation mainly on smoking hasn't helped to take the stigma out of the fact that non smokers are affected as well. I hope next year the wording of the proclamation can be changed by the Governor so there will be less emphasis on smoking and more on lung cancer itself and how it affect people with lung cancer whether you are a smoker, former smoker or non smoker. It is also my opinion that smoking cessation programs are very important not only for lung disease but also for diseases like heart disease, vascular diseases, and many other diseases affected by smoking. My hope for the future is that lung cancer research is given as much funding and attention as other type of cancers by the government and pharmaceutical industries. Thank God for organizations like Lung Cancer Alliance and other organizations for bringing awareness to lung cancer and supporting patients, families, and caregivers affected by this terrible disease.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 8:45 PM :: 1 people are more aware
---------------------------------------
Clarification on the Issue

I just wanted to point out that Dr. Michael Siegal clarified his issues with the Lung Cancer Alliance.

I feel it would be irresponsible of me not to post this follow-up link when I posted the original two links regarding his issues. I leave you to form your own opinions.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 8:46 AM :: 1 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Ticking Off the Internet, One Blogger At a Time

Well, I stumbled upon a blog while I was looking for people who might be blogging about lung cancer. I have been following and commenting on recent opinion on a blog from a researcher in Boston. It is his views that Lung Cancer Alliance, an advocacy organization for lung cancer research, focuses too much on the non-smokers in lung cancer.

Dr. Michael Siegal, the author of the blog, criticized Lung Cancer Alliance for the work they did in November. My dad and I took part in a rally they held. For a little background information, Lung Cancer Alliance submitted a proclamation to the governor of California, and the governor's office changed the wording so that it became more of a anti-smoking proclamation than a lung cancer proclamation. Many of us with family members who did not smoke but have/had lung cancer were disappointed by this.

Yesterday evening, Dr. Siegal posted another reply on his blog. His opinion has not changed. My opinion has not changed. However, I invite you to take a look and form your own opinions on the matter. I wish I could find the original wording of the proclamation, and the new one, so you could see that as well.

As Voltaire said, "I do not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it."

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 1:35 PM :: 4 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Sunday, January 08, 2006

Some New Links

I have done some work on the sidebar for this website. I have been thinking for a few months that we need representation of other cancers as well, with a focus on lung cancer, since that is what Laurianne was afflicted with. However, our family has been touched by cancer in so many ways. My dad's sister had breast cancer. My uncle who was the husband from my dad's other sister had lung cancer that spread to his brain. He was a heavy smoker. My mom's sister has a form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

These types of things stick with you, though. You always have in the back of your mind the what ifs and want to find ways to help the people you love. When Laurianne was pregnant with Calem, she wanted to same the umblical cord, to help my aunt with the leukemia.

It is very rare to find a family that has not been touched by cancer. An aunt, a sister, a father, a brother, a friend. Like Laurianne, I hope that Calem's generation will not have to worry so much about cancer.

Oh, and one more thing. Of course, I needed to add a Other Links. This blog has to have some general information and fun places to go also. :)

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 12:09 PM :: 2 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Friday, January 06, 2006

Two More Faces of Lung Cancer

Many of you probably heard that Lou Rawls died today from lung cancer. He was 72 years old.

The Chicago-born singer and philanthropist died at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he’d been hospitalized for lung and brain cancer since last month. His wife Nina was at his bedside when he died. Diagnosed with lung cancer in 2004 and brain cancer in 2005, Rawls stayed optomistic; a post on his Web site said “don’t count me out.”

Rawls told Shefrin he quit smoking 35 to 40 years ago.

Asked about reports Rawls tried to treat his cancer holistically, Shefrin said: "He did try alternative methods. He used traditional and alternative methods."

Along with his wife, Rawls is survived by four children: Louanna Rawls, Lou Rawls Jr., Kendra Smith and Aiden Rawls.

I also read that Bob McLeod, a photographer in San Francisco also died from lung cancer at the age of 59. I am pretty sure I have heard his name before, living in the area.
Bob McLeod, a San Francisco newspaperman for four decades and a guy with the ability to make everyone smile, died early Tuesday of lung cancer at his Antioch home. He was 59.

A few days ago, only eight months after his diagnosis, Mr. McLeod had to have a hospital bed moved into the bedroom as hospice care took over. Even then, McLeod saw the bright side, playing with the bed's remote as it zigged him up and down.

"I believe he died with his finger on the remote control on the bed," his wife said.

In addition to his wife of 25 years and his brother, Mr. McLeod is survived by his sister, Patricia Perez of South San Francisco.
This disease makes me so angry. Two more gifted and talented people were taken from their families because of this terrible disease. No one deserves lung cancer.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Lynda :: 11:48 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------
new Blog page

Frequent visitors of my blog noticed the change in design. My daughter Lynda who make my blogpage like I know what I am doing designed it for me . She changed it from the hard blue design to this
I feel this is a big improvement over the hard blue and this is more of what Laurianne would have liked. I thank Lynda for her hard work and for bailing me out from time to time with my blog

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 10:55 AM :: 2 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Thursday, January 05, 2006

Lung Cancer Documentary

My brother-in-law who lives in Colorado send me a very interesting link. It is about lung cancer and how two children are affected by their mother's lung cancer. I think it tells the whole story about lung cancer and how it is not only affecting the person with lung cancer but also the people close to that person. This documentary brings out a lot of awareness and I hope it will be used not only locally but but possibly over the whole country.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 1:21 PM :: 1 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Wednesday, January 04, 2006

Visiting some old friends

Today Calem's great grandmother was having some surgery done in the hospital were I work. We took a opportunity to visit some people who took care of Laurianne. Everybody was very happy to see us and they were astonished by Calem's growth. It was difficult to face those people since so many memories lies at the hospital. We walked by the little room were we got her diagnosis and we were both thinking the same. We also visited Laurianne's Pulmonologist and she said she was happy to see us and we were making her day. Sunday I will go back to work and this visit we had today will make this a little easier.

Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 2:00 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------

Sunday, January 01, 2006

Recipes for a Happy new year

I found this on the internet and I thought it is very appropiate for my first blog.


Take twelve whole months.
Clean them thoroughly of all bitterness,
hate, and jealousy.
Make them just as fresh and clean as possible.

Now cut each month into twenty-eight, thirty, or
thirty-one different parts,
but don't make up the whole batch at once.
Prepare it one day at a time out of these ingredients.

Mix well into each day one part of faith,
one part of patience, one part of courage,
and one part of work.
Add to each day one part of hope,
faithfulness, generosity, and kindness.
Blend with one part prayer, one part meditation,
and one good deed.
Season the whole with a dash of good spirits,
a sprinkle of fun, a pinch of play,
and a cup full of good humor.

Pour all of this into a vessel of love.
Cook thoroughly over radiant joy,
garnish with a smile,
and serve with quietness, unselfishness,
and cheerfulness.
You're bound to have a happy new year.


Lung Cancer AwarenessPosted by Henry (Calem's Opa) :: 1:22 PM :: 0 people are more aware
---------------------------------------